Innochat Archive

'Imagine': Creativity for Innovation: Jonah Lehrer, Part 2

Renee Hopkins's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, Jun 07, 2012

You may recall that several weeks ago I led a chat called Balancing Perceptive and Analytical Thinking in Innovation, in which we looked at @JonahLehrer's How We Decide to see what he could illuminate for us about thinking innovatively.  

The Business Model Innovation Factory - Chat 2 of Joint Chat Hosted with #smchat

DrewCM's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, May 31, 2012

This is the second chat of two back-to-back chats being jointly hosted by #smchat and #innochat featuring Saul Kaplan, author of, The Business Model Innovation Factory, and Founder and Chief Catalyst, BIF.

Gamification in Innovation by Boris Pluskowski

Renee Hopkins's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, May 24, 2012

Here's Boris Pluskowski's (@bpluskowski) framing post for the May 24 chat on Gamification, originally posted here. Our thanks to Boris for a great chat! The PDF archive of that chat is below the post.

Rimshot? Moonshot? So what?!? - Is ridicule as an indicator of innovation?

DrewCM's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, May 17, 2012

One of the greatest challenges for those working in the innovation space is the recognition of innovation in terms of impact. Many of us, and our clients if we are consultants, are seeking breakthrough innovations yet true breakthroughs seem few and far between. The promise of innovation might be market transformation yet most enterprises seem to be living on a diet of incremental improvements and half-step changes as compared to much desired second order changes. The path to innovation success itself is strewn with abject failures and comical shortcomings.

So what?

Balancing Perceptive and Analytical Thinking in Innovation

Renee Hopkins's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, May 10, 2012

I'm inspired this week by Jonah Lehrer — NOT his most recent book, Imagine. Instead I want  to talk about decision-making and reference Lehrer's previous book, How We Decide, published in 2009).

Serendipitous Cyberspaces

Renee Hopkins's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, May 03, 2012

This week @sysparatem will be our guest host, leading a chat on a favorite topic of mine: serendipity. Here is his framing post: 

Not "Do We?" But "How Might We?"

Gwen Ishmael's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, Apr 26, 2012

This week’s Innochat topic was sparked by two posts:  Dimis Michaelides’ (@dimistweet) “To Innovate Or Not To Innovate? That Is Not The Question.” and Jeffrey Phillips’ (@ovoinnovation) “The Incremental Innovation Trap." 

From Idea to Pitch: Incubating Start-Ups in Business Schools

Renee Hopkins's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, Apr 19, 2012

This week our guest is Michael Garel of EyeQ, a startup so new it doesn't yet have a website! Michael is an MBA student at The University of Texas at Austin. He and his partner won the Texas Venture Labs Investment Competition in February, and will compete in the Global Venture Labs Investment Competition May 2-4.

Building a Future-Proof Business

Gwen Ishmael's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, Apr 12, 2012

This week's guest moderator @VolcadoDePila - aka Daniel Trujillo, Service Manager at Wall Street Institute - poses this framing for our 12 April chat. Looking forward to seeing everyone there!

Gwen

Product innovation has long been revered as the best source of sustainability in a company. The advent of new, better products has been placed at the top in many a priority list of middle level managers and the C-suite. Yet these new products do not always represent growth or even a bigger market share, let alone the survival of the company over time. What is more, the measures taken by some companies to save themselves amidst the new, tougher conditions are sometimes evidently desperate ones. Consider what happened to RIM and its Playbook, or the case of Nokia and its N8, or furthermore Nokia´s relinquishing of its flagship Symbian platform for Windows Phone.

Measures such as those taken by the companies cited in the above examples show what happens when a company fails to prepare adequately for the future, and just how despair driven can some of these measures be.

But if a brand is to remain in the market, if it is going to be a market leader for years, it needs more than the simple push of a few stellar sales quarters or a beloved line of products.

Innovation can also affect other areas of business. The processes themselves can be susceptible of changing and of being formulated anew. The perception of the collaborators and the way the business is conducted, as well as the type and pace of product innovation can all be changed to adapt to a different management vision.

Such is the topic of today´s #innochat: How to future-proof your business? Following are the questions we will review during our chat:

  • Q1: Do you believe innovation should respond to, or create needs?
  • Q2: Does the pace of innovation of your product / service answer to customers´ questions or does it create further questions and needs?
  • Q3: How do you ensure that your innovative processes will not need quick remaking?
    • Subsidiary question: Where do you get your feedback while innovating? re: Pixar
  • Q4: How do we balance preparing for the future (creating the roadmap) and being nimble enough to capitalize on unexpected opportunities (making profitable detours)?

 

Building a Future-Proof Business

Gwen Ishmael's picture
Chat Date: 
Thu, Apr 12, 2012

This week's guest moderator @VolcadoDePila - aka Daniel Trujillo, Service Manager at Wall Street Institute - poses this framing for our 12 April chat. Looking forward to seeing everyone there! Gwen


Product innovation has long been revered as the best source of sustainability in a company. The advent of new, better products has been placed at the top in many a priority list of middle level managers and the C-suite. Yet these new products do not always represent growth or even a bigger market share, let alone the survival of the company over time. What is more, the measures taken by some companies to save themselves amidst the new, tougher conditions are sometimes evidently desperate ones. Consider what happened to RIM and its Playbook, or the case of Nokia and its N8, or furthermore Nokia´s relinquishing of its flagship Symbian platform for Windows Phone.


Measures such as those taken by the companies cited in the above examples show what happens when a company fails to prepare adequately for the future, and just how despair driven can some of these measures be.


But if a brand is to remain in the market, if it is going to be a market leader for years, it needs more than the simple push of a few stellar sales quarters or a beloved line of products.


Innovation can also affect other areas of business. The processes themselves can be susceptible of changing and of being formulated anew. The perception of the collaborators and the way the business is conducted, as well as the type and pace of product innovation can all be changed to adapt to a different management vision.


Such is the topic of today´s #innochat: How to future-proof your business? Following are the questions we will review during our chat:


Q1: Do you believe innovation should respond to, or create needs?


Q2: Does the pace of innovation of your product / service answer to customers´ questions or does it create further questions and needs?


Q3: How do you ensure that your innovative processes will not need quick remaking?


Subsidiary question: Where do you get your feedback while innovating? re: Pixar


Q4: How do we balance preparing for the future (creating the roadmap) and being nimble enough to capitalize on unexpected opportunities (making profitable detours)?


 

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